[My colleague, friend and mentor Dr. Joseph Lerner showed me the following passage in the biography about Max Fisher that is excerpted below. As Dr. Lerner correctly notes, however,that “Unfortunately, for some reason, the message Eisenhower shared with Fisher – though revealed in Golden’s book never made it beyond that page”. Indeed, the fact that the US guarantees were never really made to Israel in 1957 as a prerequisite for Israel withdrawing from the Sinai speaks for itself. – DB]
Eisenhower was hotheaded in the situation. His telephone call to Prime Minister Anthony Eden was delivered in a crude barracks-style tongue lashing. Two days into the war he admonished Prime Minister Ben Gurion “… you ought not forget that the strength of Israel and her future are bound up with the United States.” This was followed by specific threats: If Israel did not leave Sinai and Gaza there would be U.N. condemnation, U.S. aid would be terminated, the tax-status of charitable contributions would be challenged and Soviet “volunteers” might invade Israel. Critics of Israel point to Eisenhower’s treatment of Israel in this episode as exemplary. Later, he changed his mind regarding Israel.
In October, 1965 Max M. Fisher visited Eisenhower at his Gettysburg farm. Eisenhower told him “… looking back at Suez, I regret what I did. I never should have pressed Israel to evacuate the Sinai. He continued: “… If I’d had a Jewish advisor working for me, I doubt I would have handled the situation the same way. I would not have forced the Israelis back” (Peter Golden, “Quiet Diplomat, Max M. Fisher” pp.xviii – xix,Herzl Press 1992).

Eisenhower was hotheaded in the situation. His telephone call to Prime Minister Anthony Eden was delivered in a crude barracks-style tongue lashing.

Two days into the war he admonished Prime Minister Ben Gurion “… you ought not forget that the strength of Israel and her future are bound up with the United States.” This was followed by specific threats: If Israel did not leave Sinai and Gaza there would be U.N. condemnation, U.S. aid would be terminated, the tax-status of charitable contributions would be challenged and Soviet “volunteers” might invade Israel. Critics of Israel point to Eisenhower’s treatment of Israel in this episode as exemplary. Later, he changed his mind regarding Israel.

In October, 1965 Max M. Fisher visited Eisenhower at his Gettysburg farm. Eisenhower told him “… looking back at Suez, I regret what I did. I never should have pressed Israel to evacuate the Sinai. He continued: “… If I’d had a Jewish advisor working for me, I doubt I would have handled the situation the same way. I would not have forced the Israelis back” (Peter Golden, “Quiet Diplomat, Max M. Fisher” pp.xviii – xix,Herzl Press 1992)

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